Wednesday, December 5, 2007

Blog Tours - What Would You Like to Know

I'm doing a tele-seminar next week about blog tours and I would love input from you all.

There are many things to discuss about blog tours and I worked out some initial questions to get people thinking - they are:

Discover Ways to Promote Your Book on a Virtual Blog Tour to Gain Greater Visibility and Sales

  • What are the benefits of doing a blog tour?
  • Should you promote your book in a blog tour?
  • Should fiction and non fiction books be promoted differently in a blog tour?
  • Should you organize your own blog tour?
  • Why hire a publicist to organize your tour?
  • If you hire a publicist, will you still need to work on the tour?
  • Can you use a blog tour to promote anything besides books?
  • Is there a new option in book blog tours?

But, now I need to create a couple of handouts and I'd love your input. Is there any specific info about blog tours that any of you think would be most helpful? Some folks here have done tours, some have hosted touring authors and I bet some of you have thought about doing a tour. So, since many of the people here are authors, I figured it would be a great place to pose the question. What information would you suggest I offer in handouts? Thank you all for your thoughts. There will be plenty of blog tour info coming very soon .

Nikki Leigh

PS - The answer to the last question is - most definitely. Stay tuned for much more information about that option - SOON. Or, contact me to be added to the mailing list - nikki_leigh22939@yahoo.com with Mailing List in the subject line.

Friday, November 30, 2007

Katy's Cookbook by Colin Harvey


1 - How did you get interested in the topic that’s featured in your book?

Well, my publisher asked each of the Swimming Kangaroo authors for a recipe for a charity cookbook, and I went flicking through (my wife) Katy’s book of recipes that she’s written up and copied out over the years, often adapting to taste. I couldn’t read her writing, so decided to type it up then realized I had enough for several books.

At the same time, I had started to cook as my day-job wound down, and realized that I could cook if I had a recipe to follow.

From there it was a short conversation with my publisher. When I asked whether she would like to publish a cook-book, she agreed straight away.

2 - Tell us a bit about your background. What have you done in the past that relates to your book and that topic?

My wife finds it difficult to believe, but I actually cooked before I met her. But the results were often erratic and hard to classify! Add to it that I tended to use whatever was in the fridge, and she could end up with chilli con sardines, or pizza trifle.

3 - What advise would you give to someone who is interested in your topic?

It’s like everything else - practice, practice, practice. The chefs that you see on TV have been cooking the equivalent of ten or even twenty several meals a day for years on end. I found after even a month that I was getting more confident, and therefore better able to salvage a ‘crisis’ when it occurred.

4 - What do you see as the benefit to participating in groups and organizations? My first thought would be networking opportunities and the chance for personal and business growth. What are your reasons?

I would echo that; group participation means fresh ideas and possibilities.

5 - Who is the ideal person to read your book? If each person that reads this was going to recommend your book to one person, what sort of person would they want to chose?

The ideal person would be people leaving home or living on their own for the first time, like students or freshly separated people with no cooking experience. There are a few complicated recipes for the more advanced cooks, but most of them are as simple as possible, for culinary dummies like me!

6 - What do you think ignites a person’s creativity?

I find the greatest stimulus is outside input; going to new places, trying a new recipe, meeting someone for the first time.

7 - What have you found to be the biggest stumbling block for people who want to start writing?

Those people themselves. No-one else can make you or free you to write. The world doesn’t owe you. If you want to write, get on with it.

8 - How would you suggest they can overcome that?

Write every day. I keep saying this, and I’ll keep saying it. It will take time, and you may not yet be ready, but one of the lessons to learn is patience, and another is persistence. But none of that matters if you don’t write.

9 - What do you find is the biggest motivator for people to succeed? Is it money, security, desire for fame or something else?

The writers who succeed are the ones who want it the most, who if they don’t write every day, start to feel twitchy, who can’t think of anything else they want to be. Who, if they have a career, believe that it’s all just research for writing. It doesn’t just apply to writing look at the tycoons, they’re all people who have no life apart from making money.

10 - Who is the ‘perfect’ person to read your book?

People who believe that they can’t cook, but want to try to learn.

11 - Is there anything else you would like to share with us?

Only that you can order it from the Swimming Kangaroo website at http://www.swimmingkangaroo.com

Sunday, November 25, 2007

Woman Submit



1 - How did you get interested in the topic that's featured in your book? I was beaten into it.

2 - Tell us a bit about your background. What have you done in the past that relates to your book and that topic? The title of the book is, Woman Submit! Christians & Domestic Violence. I experienced domestic violence and abuse for a period of nine years over the course of two marriages. The most violent of the two marriages was the last in which my former husband was an associate pastor of our church.

3 - What advice would you give to someone who is interested in your topic? It would really depend on why they were interested. Someone could be interested because they are experiencing abuse or domestic violence. Or they could be interested because someone they know and love is experiencing domestic violence. The book is written and contains advice for both groups.

4 - What do you see as the benefit to participating in groups and organizations? My first thought would be networking opportunities and the chance for personal and business growth. What are your reasons? I have started The Dorcas Network, which is an organization committed to working with [primarily] Christian individuals and ministries desiring to reach out in more compassionate, effective, and biblical ways to the battered/abused women within their spheres of influence. We can certainly accomplish more together than alone.

5 - Who is the ideal person to read your book? Women experiencing domestic violence or abuse and those they are most likely to turn to for help. If each person that reads this was going to recommend your book to one person, what sort of person would they want to chose? Women experiencing domestic violence or abuse or those they are most likely to turn to for help--including pastors and other spiritual leaders.

6 - What do you think ignites a person's creativity? I believe we write best when we write honestly about what we feel strongly about. As for myself, I cannot even stay interested in writing about anything I am not passionate about. And if I cannot stay interested in what I am writing, how can I expect anyone else to stay interested in reading what I write?

7 - What have you found to be the biggest stumbling block for people who want to start writing? Not having anything to say of course.

8 - How would you suggest they can overcome that? Find out what it is they feel strongly--even passionately--about, and write about that.

9 - What do you find is the biggest motivator for people to succeed? Is it money, security, desire for fame or something else? Different things motivate different people. Money and success have never been able to motivate me for very long periods of time (although like most people, I wouldn't mind having some). I committed my life to Jesus Christ many years ago, and I have found that anything he is not the center of, very quickly loses its appeal. But the things I allow His Spirit to lead me into, are the things that have endured.

10 - Who is the “perfect” person to read your book? Any woman (or man) experiencing domestic violence or abuse and those they would most likely turn to for help. And since it is estimated that one out of four women experience abuse or domestic violence (some say one out of two!), that would make the target audience for my book just about everyone.

11 - Is there anything else you would like to share with us? Yes. I would like to pass along a message that I heard for the very first time from a mother whose precious daughter lost her life due to domestic violence, “Domestic Violence IS your business!” www.WomanSubmit.com

Laundry Tales


1. How did you get interested in the topic?
It came from a post about laundry by one of the Celebrate Moms team members. This post on the message board received about 3 pages of responses from our moms. We knew then it is a topic of interest.

2. Our background...What have we done in the past that relates to our book and that topic?
The whole Celebrate Moms website points to the book's message of "Lighten your Load". Our tagline for Celebrate Moms is "The Mother Load Gets Lighter Here".

3. What advice would we give to someone who is interested in our topic?
We can learn from anything in life, even the mundane things like laundry.

4. What do we see as the benefit to participating in groups and organizations other than networking and personal /business growth?
Groups and organizations help us learn from one another and offer a support system.

5. Who is the ideal person to read our book?
The ideal audience for Laundry Tales to Lighten Your Load is made up of mothers ages 20-50. These ladies are the primary overseers of the household laundering chores, seeking acknowledgement and companionship in a lowly job. They are either currently Christians looking to grow closer to God in a unique way or seekers in the midst of child related struggles and open to learning more about God.

6. What do we think ignites a person's creativity?
Finding and pursuing their passion ignites creativity.

7. What have we found to be the biggest stumbling block for people to start writing?
Procrastination and lack of knowledge of how the industry works.

8. How would we suggest they can overcome that?
A quote that helps Melissa, our co-founder, is "Do what you don't want to do, so you can be what you want to be." Keep that in mind. Don't approach life, dreams etc, based on feelings. Just do it even if you don't want to do it.

9. What do we find is the biggest motivator for people to succeed?
Is it money, security, desire for fame or something else?
We feel like all three of the ones listed are big motivators but we pray we would rise above it and Celebrate Moms motivation would be to please God.

10.Who is the "perfect" person to read our book?
Laundry is never done—moms struggling to keep up with this humdrum chore will find Laundry Tales to Lighten Your Load especially encouraging and uplifting. They need help in ways they can relate to. The length of each story delivers a shot in the arm that will help moms get through yet another load.
Laundry is a lonely, boring and often thankless job—moms looking for acknowledgement, a feeling of camaraderie, and a greater sense of self-worth will finish reading Laundry Tales to Lighten Your Load feeling like they have just sat and had coffee with a trusted friend. One that understands her struggles and has inspired her to embrace all the dirt life has to offer.

11. Is there anything else we would like to share with the audience?
Laundry Tales to Lighten Your Load is a lighthearted look at the things we have learned from doing the laundry. We encourage you to pick up a copy, get a cup of coffeee and enjoy some of the stories and insights we share.

Sandra B. Stanford
Bible Teacher/Speaker/Author
WWW.Sandrastanford.com
WWW.Celebratemoms.org
Team Member
"The Mother Load Gets Lighter Here"
Visit my blog: blog.sandrastanford.com
Go to Sandra's website and order Celebrate moms
new book "Laundry Tales" !

Saturday, November 17, 2007

Don't Call Me Rosie - Kathleen Thomas



Don't Call Me Rosie, The Women who Welded the LSTs and the Men who Sailed on Them

Author: Kathleen Thomas

1 - How did you get interested in the topic that's featured in your book?

When I was young, I knew that my mother and two aunts were welders in the shipyard during World War II because my mother would occasionally talk about it. I had no idea that the ships they worked on were LSTs nor did I even know what an LST was. I was very proud that she did this non-traditional job.

In 1999, Les Parker, a former crew member of LST 743, somehow found out about my mother and two aunts and asked them to attend the LST 743 reunion banquet being held in Pittsburgh. My mother was so pleased to attend this banquet and receive recognition from the LST 743 crew.

After listening to her talk about the reunion, I decided that I wanted to write a book about the women welders. Finally, in October 2001 on a visit to Pittsburgh, I interviewed my mother and two aunts.


2 - Tell us a bit about your background. What have you done in the past that relates to your book and that topic?

I am a civil engineer and majority owner of a consulting civil engineering firm, Thomas/Wright, Inc. Nothing in my background really relates to the topic except that I am interested in history. When I was younger, I rarely read current events because I felt that when the event would be reviewed in the future as history, we would learn more about what was actually going on.

I believe there is a view that Civil Engineering and writing are mutually exclusive skills. However, one needs to be at least a good technical writer to be successful as an engineering consultant. I have strong organizational and listening skills. These were invaluable in writing a book such as “Don't Call Me Rosie”.


3 - What advise would you give to someone who is interested in your topic?

Since the “greatest generation” is dying at a significant pace, the first thing I would advise is to talk to anyone you know in this generation about their experiences during World War II.

LST 325 is located in Evansville, IL and the website is http://www.lstmemorial.org

There is a discussion group on that website that one can join.

I also have a Bibliography at the end of my book and would recommend reading the books I used for my research.


4 - What do you see as the benefit to participating in groups and organizations? My first thought would be networking opportunities and the chance for personal and business growth. What are your reasons?

Networking opportunities and the ability to learn from others with similar interests. Most of my involvement in organizations has been on the professional side but sometimes I find a group that I enjoy because its members are fun to be with and are interesting.


5 - Who is the ideal person to read your book? If each person that reads this was going to recommend your book to one person, what sort of person would they want to chose?

An individual interested in World War II history and the involvement and interrelationship of both women's and men's role during that time period.


6 - What do you think ignites a person's creativity?

I really don't know the answer to this question. However, I would recommend a balanced lifestyle in which one is happy with what they are doing in life. If one isn't happy, then I think they need to take steps to change it.


7 - What have you found to be the biggest stumbling block for people who want to start writing?

I feel that some people are overwhelmed by the thought of producing a book in its entirety instead of recognizing that books are written one chapter at a time.

8 - How would you suggest they can overcome that?

First, produce an outline of the book. If one gets stuck on a chapter, skip it and go to the next chapter. You can always come back to the chapter you are stuck on but if you don't continue on, the book may never be completed.

When I was writing my book, I would realize I might need another oral history to include in it for a particular chapter. While I was trying to locate that individual, I could still continue on with another chapter in which I had all the information and research completed.


9 - What do you find is the biggest motivator for people to succeed? Is it money, security, desire for fame or something else?

I think it is different for each person. A secure and comfortable lifestyle is important to me. However, I think my genetics and family upbringing have made me a motivated person in general. I would not object to fame (i.e. author on the bestsellers list) but I feel it is a double edged sword that can intrude on one's lifestyle.

10 - Who is the “perfect” person to read your book?

The son or daughter of parents who lived during World War II.

I also feel that high school students would benefit from reading it since the oral histories would have more meaning to them then learning a bunch of dates about events without really comprehending the significance of those events.


11 - Is there anything else you would like to share with us?

I know that your blog is time consuming to produce and appreciate the opportunity you are giving authors to be a part of it. Thank you.

Sunday, November 4, 2007

Your Guide to Marketing in the Christian Marketplace


1 - How did you get interested in the topic that's featured in your book?

My husband and I published a set of board book for infants and toddlers and then set about the task of marketing these books in the Christian Marketplace. Out of this experience, Christian Small Publishers Association (CSPA) was born. CSPA's mission is to assist publishers in marketing their books to the Christian marketplace. As the director of CSPA, it became clear to me that a marketing guidebook was needed for emerging Christian authors and publishers.

2 - Tell us a bit about your background. What have you done in the past that relates to your book and that topic?

As mentioned in the first question, I am the director of Christian Small Publishers Association (www.christianpublishers.net). The purpose of this organization is to represent, strengthen, and promote small publishers in the Christian marketplace. CSPA was started in 2004 and I have spent the last 4 years providing information and assistance to new and emerging publishers in marketing in the Christian marketplace. The resources in the book are an accumulation of 4+ years of research.

3 - What advice would you give to someone who is interested in your topic?

Read my book, Your Guide to Marketing Books in the Christian Marketplace.

4 - What do you see as the benefit to participating in groups and organizations? My first thought would be networking opportunities and the chance for personal and business growth. What are your reasons?

If you visit my book's website (www.marketingchristianbooks.com), you will find an excerpt of the first chapter of the book. In this chapter, I list four benefits of participating in an organization. These include: respect in your industry, cutting-edge information, saving money, and doors of opportunity as a result of networking.

5 - Who is the ideal person to read your book? If each person that reads this was going to recommend your book to one person, what sort of person would they want to chose?

My book is for any author of a Christian book that he/she is trying to promote and for anyone who is publishing materials for the Christian marketplace.

6 - What do you think ignites a person's creativity?

Creativity is such an individual process. What ignites one person's creativity does nothing for another. Each individual needs to find where their spark comes from. Mine flows from my passions.

7 - What have you found to be the biggest stumbling block for people who want to start writing?

I have found that many people desiring to write feel that they need all the material before they can begin. Another words, they think they have to sit down and write a whole book. Writing starts with just a few words.

8 - How would you suggest they can overcome that?

Start with just writing your thoughts; even in outline form. Consider beginning with an article, poem, or short story. There are literally hundreds of places on the web where you can post an article or essay for free.

9 - What do you find is the biggest motivator for people to succeed? Is it money, security, desire for fame or something else?

I believe that desire is generally the biggest factor in success. You have to want something enough to work hard to obtain it. Drive goes hand-in-hand with desire. Desire fuels the drive. The drive is what gets the work done to make success happen. It's what causes people to keep at something when rewards are not immediate.

10 - Who is the “perfect” person to read your book?

Your Guide to Marketing Books in the Christian Marketplace is for any author of a Christian book or any person who is or is interested in publishing a Christian book.

Sunday, October 21, 2007

Its My Crisis and I'll Cry If I Need To - Yocheved Golani


1 - How did you get interested in the topic that’s featured in your book? Friends were fascinaed that I did not have a nervous breakdown when I learned that I needed life-saving surgery or while I recovered from it.

2 - Tell us a bit about your background. What have you done in the past that relates to your book and that topic? I'm a professional writer. I used to be a Health Information Management professional. That means that I analyzed medical records in psychiatric and medical institutions for legal, research/statistical, insurance and other purposes. I wrote articles for career-related publications, found out I was good at it, and left my high-pressure career to become a freelance writer. Eventually I began performing writing services for various clients and I wrote two published novels. My HIM career gave me the know-how to face my medical emergency with some useful insight for my medical needs and for preparing my newest and non-fiction book, It's MY Crisis! And I'll Cry if I Need To.

3 - What advise would you give to someone who is interested in your topic? Be a dedicated fact-checker. Non-fiction is non-nonsense work. Your credibility as a writer depends on your fact-checking and accuracy. And be a captivating writer. KNow what makes a reader turn the page for more input. Develop writing skills that hold reader interest.

4 - What do you see as the benefit to participating in groups and organizations? My first thought would be networking opportunities and the chance for personal and business growth. What are your reasons? The standout benefit is the networkng opportunity. Next comes the chance to learn from people in those groups and organizations. Feedback is an indispensable tool for preparing a book people want to read. I find that my friends can't always be impartial: they're afraid to hurt my feelings. But career professionals are neutral, focused on meeting a particular goal. I'm confident of getting valuable, candid remarks from them. The personal growth that can result from interacting with people from various walks of life is wonderful at building a writer's appreciation for humanity and differnt points of view. Such interaction also increases your social insight and sophistication.

5 - Who is the ideal person to read your book? If each person that reads this was going to recommend your book to one person, what sort of person would they want to chose? The ideal readers of It's MY Crisis! And I'll Cry if I Need To are someone who wants to help a loved one through a medical crisis. That loved one can be family, friend or colleague. The other ideal reader is the person experiencing the medical crisis or challenge.

6 - What do you think ignites a person’s creativity? A cause. Writing is a laborious task. There's a joke that says "Wwriting a book is a career option for the leisure class." Such people have enough money to spend time off from a paying job in order to write a book. A creative person feels a need to express themselves in some way: print, painting, sculpture, writng, music, you name it. That fire in the belly is what enables people with insufficient income to reach their creative goals.

7 - What have you found to be the biggest stumbling block for people who want to start writing? Not knowing how to start! People stare at a blank piece of paper or a blank screen and they panic. The solution, for me at least, is to use a sense of humor. I long ago broke my writer's freeze by writing about the white rabbit running through a snowstorm. I made one version funny, the other a news article. It banished my sense of panic about writing forever. Whenever I seem to be blocked as a writer, I write something off the wall, or read something very funny to get my mind recharged. Sometimes I write really, really bad first, second and third drafts. Anne Lamott has a more graphic name for them, and I find her take on rough drafts very comforting.

8 - How would you suggest they can overcome that? Experiment in order to find what works for you. There is more than one way to become a professional writer. Some people need to prepare outlines, others use grocery lists of ideas and story development. Other people use software suited to their writing purpose. I like to use a Hot Pen technique: writing until I must put my pen down of get off the keyboard. Then I assess what's worth using, what has to be trashed. I refine my text until I'm ready to let go of it. Attend free writer's workshops or start one. Then again, JK Rowling made a fortune by writing on scraps of paper at the start of her writng career. It worked for her. Go with your own flow. And use stress busting strategies that don't bother the neighbors. One more thing: you have to be willing to let go of your work once you've done enough with it. If you keep tweaking the text too long, you're not going to get it published. Every writer looks back at some of their published work and knows they could have done this or that to make it "better." But extreme perfectionism doesn't belong in the writing profession. It belongs in your "issues resolved" department.

9 - What do you find is the biggest motivator for people to succeed? Is it money, security, desire for fame or something else? It depends on the person. I want to help people with my book. And I want to make money at what I do. Writing is my line of work. I can't afford to volunteer my book preparation time. I communicate with several writers who moan and groan about how much money they invested in getting their books published. I keep telling people that I wrote my books in order to make money, not to lose it. Fame is an alluring factor for some writers. Getting name recognition in the wide world can boost a career with additional clients, speaking engagements, new career developments and personal satisfaction. Fame also sells your book! As for security, that's for best-selling authors and syndicated writers. They expect steady income as a direct result of their endeavors. The rest of us pray for the income from our writing efforts.

10 - Who is the “perfect” person to read your book? What a great question! I had to reflect on it a while to give you an intelligent answer. The perfect person to read It's MY Crisis! And I'll Cry if I Need To is someone who will tell other people to buy it. They'll do that because the book helped them or someone they know in specific ways, or they understand how it can help other people facing a medical crisis.

11 - Is there anything else you would like to share with us? Yes. Make off-the-cuff elevator speeches about your book. It's a technique I accidentally figured out when I described my developing book to acquaintances. I heard myself telling people what the book was for, who'd need it, the issues it could solve and the problems it would prevent. Then they'd ask me open-ended questions or make suggestions about the book. I then realized that other angles could definitely be addressed within my developing book. Suddenly, my rough draft took on fresh, new life. I better understood my purpose for writing It's MY Crisis! And I'll Cry if I Need To. So I suggest that you keep telling willing listeners what you book is about, why you're writing it and who'd want to read it. You'll refine your writing goals that way, find your purpose for writing, and forge ahead with progress. You will be absolutely sure of your sense of purpose in writing.

--
Yocheved Golani
Self Help Coach
Make the Changes You Need in Your Life.
http://itsmycrisisandillcryifineedto.blogspot.com/

Sunday, October 14, 2007

Lifetips 101 Entrepreneur Tips by Susan Payton


1 - How did you get interested in the topic that’s featured in your book?
My book is for entrepreneurs. I’ve always been one, and as I make mistakes and see what works, I want to help others in their success.

2 - Tell us a bit about your background. What have you done in the past that relates to your book and that topic?
I have had several entrepreneurial endeavors: I sold athletic shoes on eBay, designed gift baskets, and now run Egg Marketing & Public Relations.

3 - What advise would you give to someone who is interested in your topic?
Research. Read as much as you can about running a business. Thousands of people have gone before you (and many failed), so learn from what they have already done.

4 - What do you see as the benefit to participating in groups and organizations? My first thought would be networking opportunities and the chance for personal and business growth. What are your reasons?
Networking is a major part of my marketing company’s growth. It’s about developing relationships, not getting sales. You instantly create a support group by regularly attending networking events, and when the need arises for your product, you’re the first one on their mind. Also, when you need something, you’re more likely to seek it within that group.

5 - Who is the ideal person to read your book? If each person that reads this was going to recommend your book to one person, what sort of person would they want to chose?Someone just starting out as an entrepreneur would be the ideal person to read this book. A good referral would be someone who wants to start a business but doesn’t really know what it will entail. It’s an eye opener that I believe every entrepreneur should be aware of before they invest money.

6 - What do you think ignites a person’s creativity?
Doing what you love ignites creativity. When you’re stifled and hate what you do, you can never be creative.

7 - What have you found to be the biggest stumbling block for people who want to start writing?
Being afraid to begin. If you build it up into something big, it can seem daunting to put down that first word. But once you do, the rest just flows.

8 - How would you suggest they can overcome that?
Start writing at the beginning of the day so you don’t dread it and create the snowball effect.

9 - What do you find is the biggest motivator for people to succeed? Is it money, security, desire for fame or something else?Motivation is different for different people. A colleague just told me about a book that lists physical, mental, monetary and spiritual types of motivation. For me, it’s knowing I’ve done my best, and in all honesty, money is high on the list too!

10 - Who is the “perfect” person to read your book?
A new or seasoned entrepreneur.

11 - Is there anything else you would like to share with us?
If you have questions after reading my book, I am more than happy to answer them. Just send me an email!

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1602750149/?tag=eggmarpubrel-20

smpayton@eggmarketingpr.com

Monday, October 1, 2007

Only Moments by Nick Oliva


1 - How did you get interested in the topic that’s featured in your book?
A few of my favorite writers are Dalton Trumbo, Herman Hesse, Ken Kesey, and Kurt Vonnegut. With a past heritage like that my writing just naturally falls into life-lesson scenarios. I enjoy writing meaningful prose with a message, not that I am the all-knowing being in the universe, but I have enough scars to show, and I think that my experiences are common to most. I think people are looking for a way to understand the chaos that surrounds them and I love bringing order to chaos.

2 - Tell us a bit about your background. What have you done in the past that relates to your book and that topic?
Having a degree in music and being a musician gave me a ability to write in melodic rhythm and that was most fun, combining the two different arts.


3 - What advice would you give to someone who is interested in your topic?
I would say if they are interested they can begin to understand the incredible life-force within them. To tap that energy, is to begin to be on the road for really tasting and drinking of the essence of existence. One does not need to immerse oneself in mysticism or combative religions to understand the gift of soul given to each one of us. One only has to live that life to the fullest without concern of others draining their energies or having self-doubt. As the book warns "they believed without question, without doubt," to embrace any absolute is to tread dangerously into mindless ritual without understanding where it all came from historically and of restrictive human structure, to corral the senses to submission instead of celebrating them.

4 - What do you see as the benefit to participating in groups and organizations? My first thought would be networking opportunities and the chance for personal and business growth. What are your reasons?
That is the business side, and most writers don't have the time to nourish those contacts and still be able to have time for their art. That is the most difficult part of being a "success." The internet is well-placed for such groups because the physical presence is not necessary. One has to define what 'success" means to them. A hometown welcoming, a presence on Amazon.com, a review by the NY Times, a well-received book, etc. No one usually makes huge sums of money selling books these days unless they are a celebrity or a murderer or both.


5 - Who is the ideal person to read your book? If each person that reads this was going to recommend your book to one person, what sort of person would they want to chose?
There is no ideal person. I would hope that the book has enough there to satisfy the curious of all ages. It would really help a person in their twenties and thirties that haven't lived enough time to understand that nothing really matters and that time eventually is the only thing we really have and that doesn't last very long, so embrace life and live it now.

6 - What do you think ignites a person’s creativity?
Passion. Passion that takes over when one want to tell a story, paint a picture, write a song, perform a concert, etc. Without it you have an empty shell.

7 - What have you found to be the biggest stumbling block for people who want to start writing?
Everyone thinks that they will make millions of dollars telling their story. Forget money, do it for yourself and you will be way ahead of the game. The fact that you can finish a novel or book means more than anything else. You done more than 99% of those who have started off they way you did - But you finished it!

8 - How would you suggest they can overcome that?
Lower your expectations and learn to take criticism that will help you be a better communicator of what it is that you write. Keeping writing and you will get better and better.

9 - What do you find is the biggest motivator for people to succeed? Is it money, security, desire for fame or something else?
It really depends on the person. My personal motivation is to leave a legacy. To know that I have made a difference in a few people's lives. That is all I can ask.

10 - Who is the “perfect” person to read your book?
As the book is about imperfection, the more confused and imperfect the person, the better.

11 - Is there anything else you would like to share with us?
As a new writer, try not to get bogged down with pretty words and tangential plots. If it doesn't drive the plot-get rid of it! Read when your are reading-write when you are writing. To do both is to possibly allow the subconscious to write in the fashion that you are currently reading and you really want your own voice to shine, not someone else's.

Wednesday, September 26, 2007

Scott Zema - Three Steps to Investment Success


1 - How did you get interested in the topic that’s featured in your book?

It's really an compilation of the knowledge that I have received throughout my academic and professional career.

2 - Tell us a bit about your background. What have you done in the past that relates to your book and that topic?

I have lived and breathed art, antiques and collectibles for the past 40 years as a dealer, appraiser, and academic. Currently I am a full-time professional appraiser, trained and certified by the International Society of Appraisers. I am based in the Pacific Northwest but have a national clientelle; my clients include the University of Washington, the Seattle Art Museum, local municipalities, corporations, numerous other institutions, and many private investors.

3 - What advice would you give to someone who is interested in your topic?

Know what it is you are buying before you buy it, if you care where your money goes.

4 - What do you see as the benefit to participating in groups and organizations? My first thought would be networking opportunities and the chance for personal and business growth. What are your reasons?

Yes, those reasons are fine, but my primary interest is to keep up with the most current state of professional knowledge and practice.

5 - Who is the ideal person to read your book? If each person that reads this was going to recommend your book to one person, what sort of person would they want to chose?

The target audience is the generally educated and intelligent reader who has an interest in valuable properties to begin with, but who has literally no guidance beyond 'Buy what you like!' to insure that his economic sense is consonant with his tastes in these properties. IT IS NOT meant to convert Mr. Average Investor with NO interest in art and antiques to the investment cause, because this type of person doesn't really have the knack for making the best investment choices in these properties. Incidently, this problem in the past has impeded clear understanding of the investment potential of these properties, because the analysis is conducted by investment experts who have no knowledge of or interest in these properties to begin with, a major handicap in presenting any argument for investing in valuable objects.

Both experienced investors and beginners--the book is actually tailored to beginners--can find much of use in the book.

6 - What do you think ignites a person’s creativity?

From necessity to serendipitous inspiration, and everything in between.

7 - What have you found to be the biggest stumbling block for people who want to start writing?

Deciding on what to do and carrying the project to completion.

8 - How would you suggest they can overcome that?

Focus, focus, focus.

9 - What do you find is the biggest motivator for people to succeed? Is it money, security, desire for fame or something else?

Probably a desire for respectability at some level, both from other people and from oneself.

10 - Who is the “perfect” person to read your book?

The target audience is the generally educated and intelligent reader who has an interest in valuable properties to begin with, but who has literally no guidance beyond 'Buy what you like!' to insure that his economic sense is consonant with his tastes in these properties.

Post a comment for Scott on Thursday September 27th and be entered for a chance to win a copy of his book.

Tuesday, September 18, 2007

The Permission Seeker’s Guide the Legal Jungle by Joy Butler


Posting for Joy R. Butler, Author of The Permission Seeker’s Guide Through the Legal Jungle: Clearing Copyrights, Trademarks and Other Rights for Entertainment and Media Productions

1 - How did you get interested in the topic that’s featured in your book?First, let me explain the topic. The book is a resource on copyright, licensing, and related legal issues. Specifically, it explains to media producers how to use quotes, music, pictures, and other protected materials in their productions – without running afoul of the law. The process is called “clearing rights” and entails verifying that your media production contains no material that violates the rights of another person or that violates any relevant laws.

As an entertainment and intellectual property law attorney, I regularly help clients clear rights in their media productions. I use the term media production broadly to encompass film, television programs, newspapers, posters, CDs, websites, computer games, photographs, advertisements, and a host of other media through which people communicate.

2 - Tell us a bit about your background. What have you done in the past that relates to your book and that topic?For the past fourteen years, I have been an attorney focusing on entertainment, intellectual property, and business law. Many say there is an artist inside every entertainment attorney. I am no exception. Since elementary school, I have found creative outlets through music, dance, and creative writing.

In my practice, I work with clients developing projects in music, publishing, film, television and new media. Recent projects include representing independent producers of television programming; negotiating literary agency agreements and script sales on behalf of writers; and advising producers on potential liability for copyright, right of publicity, and defamation claims.

3 - What advise would you give to someone who is interested in your topic?Rights clearance is not always straight-forward and can be frustrating. The good news is that media producers have the power to exercise control over the process and minimize their trouble and costs by allowing plenty of time for rights clearance and by remaining flexible throughout the process.


4 - What do you see as the benefit to participating in groups and organizations? My first thought would be networking opportunities and the chance for personal and business growth. What are your reasons?I participate in attorney groups such as the New York State Bar Media Law Committee as well as media-specific groups such as Women in Film and Video and the Women’s National Book Association. The groups offer me a means to stay current on industry trends and to meet people who share my interests.

5 - Who is the ideal person to read your book? If each person that reads this was going to recommend your book to one person, what sort of person would they want to chose?My book is designed to assist media producers facing rights clearance questions. Throughout the book, there are practical guidelines and tips for the permissible and affordable incorporation of other people’s material into a media production. A fifty-page appendix includes sample licensing fees, useful organizations, and model license and permission forms.

6 - What do you think ignites a person’s creativity?Creativity comes from natural talent combined with a desire and/or need to express oneself.

7 - What have you found to be the biggest stumbling block for people who want to start writing?
The biggest stumbling block is not to become intimidated by the enormity of the task.

8 - How would you suggest they can overcome that?I suggest that aspiring writers break each writing project into manageable tasks. When I began writing The Permission Seeker’s Guide Through the Legal Jungle, I did not sit down in front of a blank computer screen and say to myself “I am now going to research and write a 408-page book.” That would have been overwhelming. Instead, I began with an outline and approached each section of the book separately.

9 - What do you find is the biggest motivator for people to succeed? Is it money, security, desire for fame or something else?You have named three of the motivations at the top of the list. Ultimately, the motivating factor depends upon the individual person.

10 - Who is the “perfect” person to read your book?The “perfect” person is anyone who produces, acquires, distributes, or otherwise works with media productions. The book summarizes relevant laws including copyright, trademark, privacy, and defamation and uses numerous illustrative examples from real-life cases. Each chapter is broken up into smaller sections. The reader can use it encyclopedia style for a quick answer to an immediate question. Alternatively, producers can read it cover to cover for a more complete overview of the rights clearance landscape.

11 - Is there anything else you would like to share with us?
Don’t drive with your eyes closed!

Failing to clear rights is a gamble for media producers. I analogize the risk of ignoring rights clearance to the risk of driving a car with your eyes closed. If you drive your car with your eyes closed for twenty seconds, you might get through the experience without damaging any property or injuring yourself. But what if you drive with your eyes closed on a regular basis. You make entire road trips this way. Sooner or later, you are going to crash. It is the same scenario for rights clearance. If you produce on a regular basis and you ignore rights issues, there will eventually be consequences.

Readers can find additional information about The Permission Seeker’s Guide the Legal Jungle: Clearing Copyrights, Trademarks and Other Rights for Entertainment and Media Productions at www.GuideThroughtheLegalJungle.com. For more information about Joy Butler’s law firm practice, visit www.JoyButler.com.

MORE DETAILS: Authored by Joy R. Butler, Published by Sashay Communications, ISBN: 978-0-9672940-1-8, 408 pages, paperback, trim size 5.5 x 8.5, $19.95. Available at bookstores and from the publisher via the website www.GuideThroughtheLegalJungle.com or via toll-free order at 877-995-8645.

Age of Speed - Vince Poscente


1 - How did you get interested in the topic that’s featured in your book?
A: “Oddly enough the obsession with speed started at 21 when a Palm Reader in Singapore told me I would die at 40. As silly as it sounds now, I had a sense of urgency.”

“This launched me into trying sky diving (with a failed main chute on my second jump) and sports like luge (“70 miles per hour in a tight rubber suit pulling four G’s lying flat on your back… Does it get any better than that?”) In a way I felt invincible.”

2 - Tell us a bit about your background. What have you done in the past that relates to your book and that topic?

“It was the sport of speed skiing that took my fascination with speed to a whole new level. Sure, you get up to 60 miles per hour in three seconds and up to 125 miles per hour in eight seconds. The problem was I was a clarinet player in the high school band. I didn’t have any ski race experience at age 26. But four short years later I was vying for gold in the 1992 Olympic Winter Games. Recreational skier to Olympics in four years is fast.”

“I learned how to accelerate outcomes. How to use speed to your advantage. Now I travel around world sharing strategies around harnessing speed to corporations and conferences.”

3 - What advise would you give to someone who is interested in your topic?

We each need a plan for putting speed to work for us rather than driving us crazy?

“The most important first step is to change how we approach our work, family and leisure life. In the past we went to work, then went home. Every weekend we would have leisure time. Those days aren’t gone but there is more of a blur between the areas of work, home and leisure. This blur is being facilitated by more demands in our 24/7 always on, hyperconnected world. Guilt follows close behind when you are sitting with your child and your boss sends you a text message on your PDA.”

“The answer is a shift in how we approach all the areas of our lives. Being clear on our values, what we value most and then connecting all that commitments we have in more of a fluid, Aikido like fashion. We simply need to embrace, not resist, the oncoming force of speed and use it to our advantage.”

4 - What do you see as the benefit to participating in groups and organizations? My first thought would be networking opportunities and the chance for personal and business growth. What are your reasons?

I often say that if you are not in an industry, you are not in the business. Being a part of your industry association, locally, regionally and/or nationally is an important part of learning and contributing.

By products of being involved are friendships and networking opportunities. Author and consultant Joe Charbonneau said, “The more you give, give, give. The more you get, get, get.”

5 - Who is the ideal person to read your book? If each person that reads this was going to recommend your book to one person, what sort of person would they want to chose?

I’d have to say from my experience at Book Expo in New York this summer it is women buying for men. It was amazing to see how many women stopped at the booth, picked up The Age of Speed and said, “Oh, my husband/boyfriend/brother/son has to read this.”

6 - What do you think ignites a person’s creativity?

Emotion. I believe that if we have an emotional connection to something creativity springs forth. Passion is another word for it. Being passionate on a subject reveals all sorts of creativity.

7 - What have you found to be the biggest stumbling block for people who want to start writing?

Fear. Fear of it being correct, lucid, innovative, funny, informative, etc. Get past the fear by just writing anything.

There’s very little about a blinking cursor that is encouraging. Just start writing and see what you come up with. The Age of Speed is my fourth book. You’d think I’d be getting good at it by now. I wrote three versions of the book before the fourth version started to look right.

8 - How would you suggest they can overcome that?

Take the part of the topic you are most passionate about. The part you have the greatest emotional connection to and write on that. Build around this part (which is now much like a chapter) and see what else you come up with.

Research always takes me to places I find interesting. Research consistently sparks ideas.

9 - What do you find is the biggest motivator for people to succeed? Is it money, security, desire for fame or something else?

I think the greatest motivator is none of these things. Enriching someone else’s life is a powerful motivator. Making them think differently, feel better about themselves, learning something, making them laugh. THAT is motivating.

10 - Who is the “perfect” person to read your book?

Zeppelins and Bottle Rockets. Some Jets. Not Balloons. Let me explain:

There are four profiles in The Age of Speed. Two will succeed. Two will ultimately fail. Let’s talk about the two failure profiles first.

The first profile is the Zeppelin. Zeppelins neither embrace speed or harness it. In fact they flat out ignore speed at their own peril. People who are in business or busy lives that completely have their head in the sand with technology or tools that could make their lives easier would be an example of a Zeppelin.

The second profile is the Bottle Rocket. Bottle rockets embrace speed but don’t harness it. They charge ahead leaving a wake of Post-it Notes and to-do lists behind them but eventually blow up.

Now for the success profiles.

There is the Jet. A Jet embraces and harnesses speed. A Jet is agile, aerodynamic and aligned. With chaos going on all around us, a Jet is a person who can be agile and flexible at high speed. A Jet reduces the number of decisions needing to be made and can shift mid course. Aerodynamics is about reducing drag. Jets remove the clutter that slows them down when they need to do more, with less and fast. Finally, being aligned is key. Trying to be who you are not, being off purpose is flat out slow.

Balloons. Balloons don’t seek speed and don’t need to. Some people in the age of speed can get away with this approach. But most of us can’t or won’t.

An example of a Balloon would be Lennard Zinn, owner of Zinn Cycles. Formerly a maker of custom bicycles on a growth pattern destined for a bulging bottom line the founder Zinn realized he wasn’t happy. He started his company because he loved being able to ride his bike to work and home again. Zinn went back to his original ways. He makes bikes at his own pace and floats along, happy with the decision to check out of the age of speed.

11 - Is there anything else you would like to share with us?

The Age of Speed is not a time management book, and I am not a time management consultant. What I am about is using every possible advantage available to us (technology included) to accelerate those things that slow us down so that we can have time to do the things that we want to savor and enjoy.

Monday, September 10, 2007

Right to Recover by Yvonne Perry


Today, Yvonne Perry will share some background for her fascinating and very educational book about stem cell research. Does the subject confuse you? Then you need to read her book. Its hard to make an educated decision about such an important topic without the starting with the facts...

1 - How did you get interested in the topic that's featured in your book?
There are two people who influenced me to write RIGHT TO RECOVER Winning the Political and Religious Wars over Stem Cell Research in America.

I met Reverend Dan Bloodworth in 2005 and immediately became intrigued by his enthusiasm regarding stem cell research. Dan's All-American athlete son, Brian, suffered a spinal cord injury when he was hit by lightning in 1987. Motivated by his desire to find a treatment that would allow his son to communicate and become mobile again, Dan has devoted 16 years of his life to learn everything he could about stem cell research and share that information with anyone willing to listen.

While working with Michael Davis on his book, FROM TRAGEDY TO TRIUMPH: A Personal Story about Living with Quadriplegia, I became keenly aware of, and very interested in, the healing potential that blastocyst (also known as embryonic) stem cell research offers victims of spinal cord injury, Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's, cancer, renal failure, paralysis, heart disease, and many other illnesses.


2 - Tell us a bit about your background. What have you done in the past that relates to your book and that topic?
I enjoy doing research on just about any topic. I'm an encyclopedia junkie! I've written more than a dozen books and over 100 articles so writing is my background. I operate a freelance writing and editing services from my home. When the topic of stem cell research kept coming up for me, I naturally started researching. The next thing I knew I had gathered enough information to write a book, so I found a publisher, pitched my idea to her and started the manuscript.


3 - What advice would you give to someone who is interested in your topic? By all means, read my book, but also do some research on your own. Talk to the people in this field, and interview those who are doing the work.


4 - What do you see as the benefit to participating in groups and organizations? My first thought would be networking opportunities and the chance for personal and business growth. What are your reasons?
The benefits of being involved in groups are tremendous. Networking is a big part of my day. I am affiliated with about a six online groups for writing and marketing. We learn a lot from one another. We share information, give one another encouragement and helpful feedback. Not a day goes by that I don't correspond with someone in one of these groups. If I know someone who needs a service another person offers, I am going to refer them to someone in my network. It's a win-win for everyone involved. Some of my best friends are online acquaintances that I have never met in person.


5 - Who is the ideal person to read your book? If each person that reads this was going to recommend your book to one person, what sort of person would they want to chose? Someone who is on the fence regarding blastocystic (embryonic) stem cell research would be able to create their own informed opinion about the research after reading my book.


6 - What do you think ignites a person's creativity? I think we all have a muse or creative spirit inside us. The creativity can come any time or any place, like in the middle of the night. Then, there are times when I have to write something by a certain date and the inspiration is not there and I'm not really interested in doing the project. That when I have to make the effort and start a project anyway, and trust that the inspiration will follow. It usually does.


7 - What have you found to be the biggest stumbling block for people who want to start writing? Procrastination and low self-esteem are the two biggest reasons people do not follow their hearts. If you do not have confidence that you are a good writer, you may not even try. But, trying is part of the process even if you are not good at it. You can always take writing courses. The more we write, the more we improve our writing skills. The more we improve, the more confidence we gain.

8 - How would you suggest they can overcome that? Writing for the fun of writing is the best remedy. When you can write without fear of being judged or feeling like your writing isn't good enough, you will find it a healing process. Enjoy each step you take no matter where you are on the journey.


9 - What do you find is the biggest motivator for people to succeed? Is it money, security, desire for fame or something else? That's different for each person. Some are motivated by money and fame. My definition of success is balance. If I enjoy what I do and make enough money to live comfortably, I am successful.


10 - Who is the “perfect” person to read your book? A person who can appreciate the amount of research time and effort that went into it! I would love to have each member of Congress read my book.


11 - Is there anything else you would like to share with us? I want to thank you for allowing me to be on your blog. You are doing a great job and I've enjoyed sharing with you.

Monday, September 3, 2007

Affordable Paradise -


Affordable Paradise, ISBN: 0971853, Skip Thomsen

1 - How did you get interested in the topic that's featured in your book?

I live in Hawaii, and for many years, my wife and I have been fielding certain questions from just about every contact we made on the Mainland. Most start out with, "I'm sooo jealous, but I could never afford to live in Hawaii." So we would go into our little speech about how it isn't that all expensive to live in Hawaii, and that we're living here on less than we spent on the Mainland. "No way," they'd exclaim, and then there began all the questions: What about jobs? Schools? Day-to-day living expenses? Medical care? Bringing pets? And on and on . . .

So one day, my wife suggested that since I am a writer and have a small publishing company, why not write a book that answers all of these continual questions? Good idea!

I wrote the First Edition of "Affordable Paradise" and no sooner had it hit the bookstores when Hawaii experienced one of the biggest real estate price increases ever. I soon started getting reviews about the obsolete values quoted in the book. The Second Edition timing was a repeat of the first, as the price increases were still going on. People were moving here in droves, buying up everything in sight.

The Third Edition was written just before the peak and came off the press right after, so those values are still pretty much in line with reality.

Such are the problems of writing a book that contains time-sensitive info! With each edition, I revised some info and added a lot more, mostly in response to reader's inquiries and suggestions. I'm actually considering avoiding actual real estate values entirely in the Fourth Edition, just to give it a bit longer shelf life! There is a lot of info in the book that has nothing to do with real estate, and that's what should be carrying the book anyway. Much of the new material is also in response to the rapidly changing demographic here on the Big Island, and how that was - and is - altering our beloved lifestyle.

2 - Tell us a bit about your background. What have you done in the past that relates to your book and that topic?
I've lived in Hawaii for 14 years and managed to do it within a budget that was no more than I would have needed where I lived in Oregon, and certainly a lot less than where my wife (of ten years) lived in California. Certainly one can spend millions to live in Hawaii, and many do. But the point of my book was originally that it isn't necessary, and why all the hype about how expensive it is to live here doesn't apply if you are really looking for an affordable lifestyle. I've lived all my adult life by creating my own reality, earning my own keep without the benefit of a "job," and doing well at it. That's how to thrive in Hawaii, and I like to share what I've learned in all these years so that others can move forward without stepping (falling?) into all the same holes I've had to. The focus of the new edition will be leaning heavily toward the concept of "living aloha," and how this is essential if we are to keep Hawaii the place that's attracting all of these people to begin with.

3 - What advice would you give to someone who is interested in your topic?
Read my book, of course! Plan your move. Learn all you can learn. Moving to Hawaii from the Mainland is not like moving from one Mainland state to another. It is way more like moving to a foreign country with foreign culture and foreign lifestyles.

4 - What do you see as the benefit to participating in groups and organizations? My first thought would be networking opportunities and the chance for personal and business growth. What are your reasons?
What you pointed out, and again, the opportunity to learn from the experiences, good or bad of others. Also, there's a lot of power in numbers, and groups can get things done that would be insurmountable for individuals. Groups have clout.
I don't know what I'd do without Greenleaf Book Group, for example. Without them (or a similar organization), I would not have my small-publisher relationship with Ingram, and that would cost me a lot of sales.

5 - Who is the ideal person to read your book? If each person that reads this was going to recommend your book to one person, what sort of person would they want to chose?
Anyone interested in moving to or living in Hawaii. Anyone already living here and feeling they can't afford to stay. The book has had reviews that pointed out it is also of value to those seeking an affordable vacation in Hawaii. It is especially useful to folks who aren't sure of how well they will be able to deal with such a different culture. Matter of fact, there's a whole chapter devoted to reasons why one might not want to live in Hawaii.

6 - What do you think ignites a person's creativity?Passion, passion, and did I say passion?

7 - What have you found to be the biggest stumbling block for people who want to start writing?
Starting to write, oddly enough. What I recommend to folks who tell me that have something to say and are having trouble getting started, is this: Just start writing down anything that comes to mind. Don't ever fret about a "proper start" to a book, or even an article. Once you get a few thoughts down (hopefully into a word processor), they'll expand almost automatically. Reread what you have written. Edit it. Flesh it out. Each topic you put down will inspire others, until finally you'll have enough (often way too much!) for what you want to end up with.

Once you have all your thoughts down, create a folder for each topic. Then read what you have again, carefully, and proceed to cut-and-paste each piece of it into the right folder until there's nothing left that is not categorized.

Now you get to go into each folder and sort out those thoughts. Make them flow. Start out with a "hook," a line that makes the reader want to read the rest of the paragraph. Each paragraph should start with an interesting sentence and then the rest of the paragraph elaborates on that sentence. At this point, you can start to cut-and-paste each subject into your first-draft manuscript and create chapters. It's so important to have it all flow.

Hey, I was only supposed to offer a suggestion on getting started. But the deal is, it's this kind of structure that works for many writers to get them going and more importantly, keep them going. Lots of great writing has been abandoned just because the writer got so far lost in an unstructured manuscript. It's easy to get overwhelmed. Quite frankly, I have to really admire the writers who could put together a beautifully flowing, cohesive novel - and do it with a typewriter! How did they do that?!

8 - How would you suggest they can overcome that?See above!

9 - What do you find is the biggest motivator for people to succeed? Is it money, security, desire for fame or something else?
My favorite saying is, "What we truly value, we do." That kind of invalidates all the excuses in the world for not doing what we say we'd really like to do. If we really, truly liked doing it, we would have a passion for doing it, and we would be doing it. It comes back to passion. It always does.

Money? Right. For most of us, I'm afraid writing is a labor of love. I feel blessed because I'm actually making a profit from my writing. Even when that happens, it's good to have another source of income. Remember, I said most of us. There are, of course, exceptions.

10 - Who is the "perfect" person to read your book?

This may sound really strange, but to date, the most rewarding emails I receive from readers are those from people who tell me they were fully ready to sell everything and move to Hawaii, and after reading my book they changed their minds. We see the heartbreak (and sometimes financial disaster) of people who move here without knowing what they will be encountering. That's the real reason for "Affordable Paradise." The affordable part finds the audience I'm after and then I share with them what it will really be like living in Paradise. Hawaii is truly Paradise to some, but it is clearly not to everyone.

11 - Is there anything else you would like to share with us?
Just that I'm glad to have this new forum in which to hopefully be able to network with others of similar interests and concerns. I wish I had had something like this when I started back in 1980. What I wouldn't have given for a mentor!

So mahalo and aloha!

Tuesday, August 21, 2007

Judi Moreo and Kim Baccelia - Virtual Tour Stops

Promotional Interview with Judi Moreo

This is the first author promotional interview that I've posted on my Self Promotion blog on the Inspired Author site. This is the first interview in a series that I'm doing with Kathleen Gage. She is posting some on her blog and I'll be posting all of the interviews on my site. To read about Judi Moreo's promotion - visit http://inspiredauthor.com/v3/promotional-interview-judi-moreo-0

~ and ~

Kim Baccellia - Young Adult Author - Earrings of Ixtumea

Join Nikki Leigh and Muze as they interview young adult author Kim Baccelia about her book - Earrings of Ixtumea.

This is the opening question of the interview -

Nikki & Muze – I was reading the synopsis for your book and was intrigued by the inner struggle that your character faces. It’s also interesting that she is confronted by the same cultural problems in the fantasy world. Can you give us some information about how you came up with this idea and what sort of problems she deals with in the story?

Kim –As a bilingual teacher in the later ‘80’s and early ‘90’s, I saw a lot with my second language students. I taught in a LA county school district, close to East LA. I also was researching my own family history at this time. I was bothered how each year my students would draw themselves blond, blue-eyed, and fair skinned. Click here to learn more about Kim and Earrings of Iztumeahttp://muzesmusings.blogspot.com/

Nikki Leigh – Fiction Author – www.nikkileigh.com
Book Promo 101 – www.nikkileigh.com/book_promo_101.htm
“Coastal Suspense with a Touch of Romance”

Sunday, August 19, 2007

Health Secrets of the Stone Age by Philip J. Goscienski, M.D.

1 - How did you get interested in the topic that’s featured in your book?

During more than 3 decades of caring for children in my medical practice I saw my patients and their parents getting more obese and out of shape. Because of my long interest in anthropology I found a book that explained what was happening. In The Paleolithic Prescription, Drs. Eaton, Shostak and Connor explain that our body chemistry is a couple of million years old but it doesn't match our lifestyle of little physical activity and foods that are not well suited to humans. Exploring this idea led me to prepare a popular seminar, Health Secrets of the Stone Age. I put it together in a book in order to make the information more widely available.

2 - Tell us a bit about your background. What have you done in the past that relates to your book and that topic?

A butterfly display started it all. Like most kids in the 1940s my friends and I spent our summers riding our bikes around town. One day we found the newly-opened natural history museum that had just assembled a huge collection of butterflies. The museum's summer vacation classes opened up the world of biology that eventually led me to a medical degree and a career as a pediatric infectious diseases specialist. Anthropology is a fascinating sideline interest that generates ideas for my newspaper column, a couple of dozen magazine articles and the book.

3 - What advise would you give to someone who is interested in your topic?

Living a long, healthy life with all your senses intact and a brain that works well is a target that almost everyone can reach. Attaining that goal is simple, but not easy: get an hour's worth of physical activity almost every day, including walking and resistance exercise (weight machines, dumbbells); avoid most processed foods because of their high content of salt, sugar and saturated fat; eat lots of fruits and vegetables and less baked goods; include fish in your diet 3 or 4 times a week; take a quality multivitamin/multimineral supplement every day. These are pretty simple steps but they have a huge impact on reducing heart disease, type 2 diabetes, osteoporosis and dementia.

4 - What do you see as the benefit to participating in groups and organizations? My first thought would be networking opportunities and the chance for personal and business growth. What are your reasons?

Nature designed humans to interact with each other in groups since the Old Stone Age – where networking began. Belonging to a close-knit group is good for our mental and physical health. Writers need to share ideas. Whether talking out loud or writing about some concept, it helps to crystallize that thought in our own mind even if the person that we share it with doesn't add to it.

5 - Who is the ideal person to read your book? If each person that reads this was going to recommend your book to one person, what sort of person would they want to chose?

The longest chapter in the book, In the house of tomorrow: start with the children, begins with a few lines from The Prophet, by Kahlil Gibran. Persons at any age will benefit from the concepts presented in Health Secrets of the Stone Age but if I had to pick a target audience it would be young adults, especially parents. The six leading causes of death in the United States are conditions that begin in early childhood, and even before birth. Changing the lifestyle habits of senior citizens won't do much to alleviate the financial healthcare crisis but if we can get today's young children to maintain normal weight and to avoid frankly dangerous foods we could almost eliminate conditions such as coronary artery disease and stroke. In 35 years of practice I never saw a child with type 2 diabetes. In today's children's medical centers so-called "adult-onset" diabetes makes up almost half the cases and that percentage will increase dramatically by mid-century. Today's kids also face a huge risk of osteoporosis for two reasons: they exercise too little and fail to get enough calcium and other bone-building nutrients during the critical window
during which 99 percent of bone mass is formed.

6 - What do you think ignites a person’s creativity?

Everyone is creative. Creativity is a combination of motivation and education. The toolbox of the mind has unlimited capacity and the more facts and ideas that we can pack into it the more resources we'll have when a person or an event gives us a reason to start using those tools. My motivation was the observation that obesity among children quadrupled between the time I finished my pediatric training and the time I retired from practice. It sparked my interest in speaking and writing about it but it was the accumulation of decades of storing up facts about scores of topics in biology and anthropology that allowed the spark to get a fire going.

7 - What have you found to be the biggest stumbling block for people who want to start writing?

Fear of failure and underestimation of one's ability to learn writing skills keep a mountain of great ideas from getting published. When I learned that the work of some of the world's most famous writers from Pearl Buck to John Grisham was rejected by dozens of publishers before appearing in print, fear of failure was no longer an issue. I keep a file folder labeled "Rejections" but it also contains letters of appreciation from readers and publishers to help me keep things in perspective. My advice to novice writers is to write and to read; write and rewrite and rewrite some more, and read as much as you can about writing.

8 - How would you suggest they can overcome that?

When you read about writers and writing you'll find that those skills are learned, even though some folks are born with the capacity to pick them up more quickly than others are. When I presented the first draft of a medical journal article to my mentor he made the corrections in red. My carefully crafted piece looked like someone had bled all over it. I learned from those embarrassing mistakes. After that paper was published it was referred to numerous times in the medical literature.

9 - What do you find is the biggest motivator for people to succeed? Is it money, security, desire for fame or something else?

Money is a great motivator for some careers but whether in writing or medicine, that's not where the joy comes from. Especially for writers of non-fiction it's probably the satisfaction of knowing that what you wrote made a difference in someone's life, that something of value exists on the planet because of you.

10 - Who is the “perfect” person to read your book?

The perfect person to read my book is the one who thinks that he or she is at risk of an illness that seems to be familial – "Diabetes is in my genes" – or who realizes that each of us does control our health but needs direction. Heredity is not destiny.

Thank you.

Tuesday, August 14, 2007

Robin Jay - Art of the Business Lunch


1 - How did you get interested in the topic that’s featured in your book? I sold advertising (TV, RADIO & PRINT) for 18 years. Because of the nature of my work, I usually had a business lunch booked three or four days a week. Put that together with breakfasts, mixers and networking events and it wasn’t long before I was booked weeks in advance.

When it came time to write my first book, I decided to write about that. I wanted to help other people by sharing what I know about building high-level business relationships by introducing a social aspect – usually lunch – into the relationship.

2 - Tell us a bit about your background. What have you done in the past that relates to your book and that topic? I sold advertising for 18 years. During that time, I learned a lot of tricks and techniques that I knew would be helpful to other business professionals. I had been on more than 3,000 client lunches and I saw my sales increase by more than 2,000%! My clients started calling me “The Queen of the Business Lunch.”

3 - What advice would you give to someone who is interested in your topic? I am a professional speaker. I enjoy speaking to all types and sizes of groups and helping others to discover “The Art of the Business Lunch”! With preparation, people can learn how to build solid, long-lasting relationships. Relationships are, by nature, sequential. There is nothing more sequential than a meal. Learning how to be prepared to socialize with clients is knowledge that will help anyone in any business. There is a lot of infor ma tion in my book on how to conduct a successful business lunch, as well as what anyone should know about a job interview business lunch, networking luncheons and events and even basic business etiquette.


4 - What do you see as the benefit to participating in groups and organizations? My first thought would be networking opportunities and the chance for personal and business growth. What are your reasons?


We become valuable for WHO we know. The more people in your network, the more successful you will be. No one succeeds all by themselves. And it’s a wonderful experience to meet and share with like-minded individuals.

5 - Who is the ideal person to read your book? If each person that reads this was going to recommend your book to one person, what sort of person would they want to chose? Anyone in sales or who has a relationship-based business. My book offers nuts-and-bolts methods for creating successful, long-lasting business relationships.


6 - What do you think ignites a person’s creativity? I believe it’s finding one’s passion. We can try ma ny things to get our creativity going…but we ned to find that one thing that ma kes time fly for us. When we become so engrossed in what we are doing, we have found our bliss. If you can earn a living doing that thing, then you are engaged in the ulti ma te creative endeavor.

7 - What have you found to be the biggest stumbling block for people who want to start writing? As Yoda said, “There is no try; you do or you do not.” My brother Barry used to quote Star Wars logic to me whenever applicable. This phrase is brilliant. If someone wants to write, (or start writing, as you put it), then they need to start writing! They ma y decide to take a class if they are unsure about how to begin. They can write a page a day – or three pages a week. They need to learn to set goals and then meet them. The book is not going to write itself. The hardest part for me was writing while I was still working a 60+ hour week. I needed to be at my desk writing by Sunday at 12PM. It was a challenge, but it was the only way I was going to get my book written. Once you are able to write professionally, it actually gets easier.

8 - How would you suggest they can overcome that? For this, I will quote NIKE: “Just do it.” Designate a time each day to write. Get in the habit of writing.


9 - What do you find is the biggest motivator for people to succeed? Is it money, security, desire for fame or something else? We each have different hot buttons. For some, it’s obviously ego. For others, it’s the need to say something. If you’re writing for money, keep your day job and just write checks! That’s the fastest way to write for money!


10 - Who is the “perfect” person to read your book? Anyone in sales or who has a relationship-based business. Also, anyone who ma y be looking to change jobs. The chapter on the job interview business lunch is packed with helpful tips.


11 - Is there anything else you would like to share with us? If you’ve ever suffered through an awkward lunch or networking event the information in my book can help you. It’s universal. We all have challenges with social situations. I share easy, tangible ways to become more effective in business and in life.
You can visit her website at http://www.robinjay.com/ and her blog at www.robinjay.com/blog.

Tuesday, August 7, 2007

Judi Moreo Author of You Are More Than Enough


We're happy to have Judi Moreo with us today. Judi has done some very interesting things and she is working to help people reach their full potential. Do you realize that You Are More Than Enough? Read on and you could find out more about yourself and what you can accomplish.


1 - How did you get interested in the topic that’s featured in your book?

As long as I can remember, I have had an interest in Self Improvement and Personal Development. I have three older sisters and they were always into looking good and doing the right thing, so I believe it just wore off on me.

2 - Tell us a bit about your background. What have you done in the past that relates to your book and that topic?


I am a motivational speaker and trainer. I have been teaching Communication, Image, and Creative thinking for many, many, many years. I have spoken at women’s conferences in Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, China, Thailand, Australia, Namibia, Botswana, South Africa, and England. Around the world, women have told me that they feel they should be more, do more, achieve more than they already have and it doesn’t seem to matter how accomplished they are, they still have this feeling of “less than”. So I decided to share with women what I know about believing in yourself and finding your own purpose, passion, and power. In addition, I owned the largest and most successful modeling school and agency in Las Vegas for 17 years.

3 - What advise would you give to someone who is interested in your topic?


The first thing I advise them to do is read ”You Are More Than Enough”. It gives them step-by-step action plans to turn their life into the life they want.

4 - What do you see as the benefit to participating in groups and organizations? My first thought would be networking opportunities and the chance for personal and business growth. What are your reasons?


Networking opportunities, of course. Plus if you get involved and become a Board Member or take on a committee, you get to practice all your skills of interpersonal communication, delegation, organizing, making decisions. You get to hear speakers that may have some knowledge that you want to learn. And you have an opportunity to give back to your community and to other people. That’s very rewarding.

5 - Who is the ideal person to read your book?


Women who want to be more, have more, do more. Women who need to feel better about themselves. If each person that reads this was going to recommend your book to one person, what sort of person would they want to chose? Someone who wants or needs more self confidence.

I’m surprised out how many men have bought the book, and then bought copies for everyone they know. One man bought 26 copies.

6 - What do you think ignites a person’s creativity?


Observation and quiet time.

7 - What have you found to be the biggest stumbling block for people who want to start writing?

They don’t know where to begin and some think they must do it all at one time.

8 - How would you suggest they can overcome that?

First off….just start. Write something every day and write in your spare time and wherever you are. I am a motivational speaker, so I travel a lot. I use my waiting time in airports for writing. I write on the plane, in hotel rooms, in restaurants. Carry a notebook with you and make a note of your observations……interesting things..humorous things…people’s interactions….describe what the people look like in detail

9 - What do you find is the biggest motivator for people to succeed? Is it money, security, desire for fame or something else?


Everyone has their own motivator. For many it is recognition…

maybe not fame….but being recognized as important to the people who matter to them.

10 - Who is the “perfect” person to read your book?


I believe everyone can benefit from my book….Parents, women reentering the workplace, people who want to improve their communication skills and their relationships. It really is a personal development course. It’s not a book that you have to read straight through. You can pick it up, choose a chapter that pertains to your life right now, and read the rest of it at another time.

11 - Is there anything else you would like to share with us?


It is my goal to get 100,000 women to read this book this year. I wrote this from my knowledge and my heart. I know it will improve your life in many ways if you read it and apply what you read. You really are “more than enough” to have, do, and be what you want.



Judi's newest book, "You Are More Than Enough: Every Woman's Guide to Purpose, Passion, and Power" is available in bookstores everywhere. ISBN #1-932173-72-2 or by calling Charlotte at (702) 896-2228.